Aji Sauce


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Makes about 3/4 cup Servings

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped seeded jalapeño chiles (about 4 large)
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped green onions (about 2 large)
  • 1/3 cup coarsely chopped sweet onion (such as Maui or Vidalia)
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons (or more) red wine vinegar or fresh lime juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Combine jalapeño chiles, green onions, sweet onion, and cilantro in processor; puree until paste forms, scraping down sides of bowl with rubber spatula several times. Add 2 tablespoons vinegar and blend until mixture is pourable but some texture still remains. Transfer to small bowl. Stir in 3/4 teaspoon coarse salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and more vinegar to taste, if desired. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.

Recipe by Steven RaichlenReviews Section

    • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped seeded jalapeño chiles (about 4 large)
    • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped green onions (about 2 large)
    • 1/3 cup coarsely chopped sweet onion (such as Maui or Vidalia)
    • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
    • 2 tablespoons (or more) red wine vinegar or fresh lime juice
    • 3/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    1. Combine jalapeño chiles, green onions, sweet onion, and cilantro in processor puree until paste forms, scraping down sides of bowl with rubber spatula several times. Add 2 tablespoons vinegar and process until mixture is blended but some texture still remains. Transfer to small bowl. Stir in 3/4 teaspoon coarse salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and more vinegar to taste, if desired. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.

    For the wet rub:

    • 6 to 8 cloves garlic, rough chopped
    • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
    • 1 tablespoon Spanish smoked paprika (pimentón)
    • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
    • 1-1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
    • 2 tablespoons ají amarillo paste (see Note below)
    • 1 tablespoon huacatay paste (see Note below)
    • Juice of 2 limes
    • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    • 1 3 to 4 pound chicken, preferably organic, spatchcocked (butterflied)
    • Aji Amarillo Sauce, for serving (see recipe)

    What is Aji Amarillo?

    Aji amarillo is a yellow pepper indigenous to the Peruvian Andes. It’s a mild-flavored pepper that is a bit sweet and delicious. They’re quite difficult to find fresh peppers in the United States. I like to use the paste, though it’s not a requirement for this recipe. It does add a nice lovely flavor and heat.

    I prefer to use serrano peppers in this recipe vs. jalapeños because it really adds the heat that’s needed. If you’re adverse to spice, well, this recipe isn’t for you. I was going to make a milder version but I would be doing it a disservice.

    Peruvians love spicy food, me included.

    The queso fresco/blanco adds a nice creaminess to this sauce and a thickness that sits on yucca fries just perfectly.

    I’ve wanted to successfully make this recipe for a long time and I have finally found the perfect ratios that make me happy.


    Peruvian Huacatay Salsa: Aji de Huacatay

    Peruvian-style pollo a la brasa, or rotisserie chicken, often comes with intriguing little containers filled with various colorful sauces. One of the sauces is typically bright yellow and spicy, made with the fruity aji amarillo chili pepper. Often there is a mysterious green salsa as well, with a unique mint-like flavor that can be difficult for North Americans to identify.

    The secret ingredient in that special green sauce is the Andean herb known as huacatay (wah-ka-tie) or Peruvian black mint. Huacatay is actually from the same genus (Tagetes) as marigolds. Though it's easy to grow, it can be hard to find fresh or dried huacatay in North America. But jarred huacatay paste is often available at Latin markets.

    Queso fresco (fresh white cheese), lime juice or vinegar is often added as well. Your favorite pollo a la brasa takeout place probably won't be willing to share their particular recipe, but it's fun to experiment and develop your own special version.


    Peruvian Green Sauce Recipe (Aji Verde)

    Heather Dessinger 2 Comments This post contains affiliate links.

    Usually when we use the words “secret sauce” or “magic sauce,” we mean some essential ingredient for a well-lived life. This Peruvian green sauce recipe, however, is an actual sauce that works magic on your taste buds.

    I’m so glad it’s not a secret, though, because it takes five minutes to make and adds vibrant flavor to so much more than Peruvian-style baked chicken.

    If you’ve never heard of it before, Peruvian green sauce is a creamy, spicy sauce that’s usually made with a paste made from aji amarillo peppers, cilantro, some kind of creamy base, garlic, and lime.

    Because aji amarillo paste is not readily available in most stores, I often make mine with fresh jalapeno peppers instead.

    My kids love it even with the spicy kick, but you can lower the heat level by using less jalapeno (or aji amarillo) if you’d like.

    Once you taste this sauce you’ll probably start putting it on everything in sight, but just in case you’d like some extra inspiration here are my favorite ways to use it:


    Aji Amarillo Sauce Recipe

    You can buy aji chiles fresh, canned, or in paste form, and can use any of those in this recipe. But I like having dried chiles on hand you can use only what you need instead of opening up a whole can or jar, and unlike fresh chiles, they last forever. Dried chiles are sweeter with deeper, concentrated flavors compared to their fresh counterparts. Drying also enhances aji's sweet, warm, back-of-the-tongue flavor.

    The paste this sauce is based on can be used like any other chile paste and is a key component to Peruvian green dipping sauce. If you use pre-made paste, this recipe uses about half a cup. You can customize this sauce to put on or in just about anything: pork, chicken, fish, rice, potatoes, squash, or greens. I enjoy it with kidney beans, which are rich and meaty, but still bland enough to let the chile's subtle flavor and heat come through. Aji amarillo sauce is often thickened with a salty cheese, mayonnaise, evaporated milk, or even crumbled saltines. I like the cheese to play off the mild beans, but if you were serving this with something like roasted chicken, you may want to substitute something creamier instead.


    Salsa Golf (Argentina)

    Salsa golf was invented by Luis Federico Leloir in the 1920s. While dining with friends at a golf club in Mar de Plata, he was unhappy eating shrimp with mayonnaise. Eager to create a better option, he asked the waiter to bring him a range of ingredients to mix together. Following many attempts, the mixture he liked best was mayonnaise with ketchup, which his friends named salsa golf .

    This South American sauce originated in Argentina, but is now found in Uruguay, Peru, Colombia, and elsewhere. Salsa golf is often used as a salad dressing, as well as a dip for meat, shrimp, and fries.

    Salsa golf. Photo by dana robinson on Wikimedia Commons.

    Ingredients:
    • 1 cup mayonnaise
    • 2 tablespoons ketchup
    • ½ teaspoon mustard
    • 1 teaspoon lime juice
    • A few drops of Worcestershire sauce
    • Salt and pepper to taste
    Preparation:
    1. Mix mayonnaise and ketchup together
    2. Stir in the rest of the ingredients
    3. Add salt and pepper to taste

    Ají Llanero (Los Llanos Orientales Hot Sauce)

    Ají Llanero is a traditional hot sauce from Los Llanos Orientales (The Eastern Plains) in Colombia. It’s located east of the Colombian Andes and north of the Amazon, and is shared between Colombia and Venezuela.

    Los Llanos are the home of the Colombian llaneros (cowboys) and where the primary economic activity is the herding of cattle, which explains why this region of the country is known for their delicious beef recipes. The most recognized dish In Los Llanos is the Veal a la Llanera, served with yuca and plantain.

    This Ají Llanero is also known in Colombia as Ají Llanero de Leche, Ají Pique Llanero, and Ajicero, or Picante Andino in Venezuela. There are different versions of this hot sauce depending on the family, cook and country. Some people add cumin, oil, onions, oregano, and more. The recipe I am sharing is very simple and traditional, but you can add more ingredients to your taste. It’s served typically with soups and stews, but it’s also delicious over grilled meats, fish and vegetables.

    1 red pepper, chopped
    1/2 habanero or ají pique, chopped
    1 garlic clove, chopped
    1 1/2 cups warm milk
    2 tablespoons chopped scallions
    1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped
    Salt and pepper to you taste


    11 International Sauces to Enliven All Your Meals

    With coronavirus making travel a tricky and even potentially dangerous prospect this year, we’re embracing the summer staycation. All week (and all summer) long, we’ll bring you transportive flavors and travel-inspired ideas from around the world, so you can take your tastebuds on a trip and give your mind a mini vacation while you’re still at home. Here, some of the best international sauce recipes from around the world to jazz up your dinners. They’re great with grilled meats, seafood, and veggies all spring and summer long, for a taste of the world closer to home.

    If you feel like your dinner table is lacking a little variety lately, one way to take it from same-old to saucy is simple. Just add sauce.

    For inspiration in adding some needed color and flavor back into your life, look to the globe. Just because travel is less possible at this time, doesn’t mean you can’t experience tastes of just about anywhere you’re daydreaming of. Nearly every cuisine on earth shares a method for enlivening simple dishes through sauce. Best of all, most of these 11 international sauces stay on the sunny side of good-for-you, for perking up your meals without working against your quarantine workout regime.

    Peru: Aji

    Peru claims more than its fair share of the world’s top restaurants, and it’s no wonder, with its culinary approach to brightness and freshness. Aji is a condiment based on pulverized pepper paste in a wide variety of colors, to form a sauce that comes together with little more than a blender. With herbs and vinegar kicking the brightness up to 11, and just a touch of egg yolk and oil for richness, you’ll want to put this Peruvian sauce on everything. Get Chef José Luis Chavez’s Aji Verde recipe .


    Watch the video: ANJI - DIA Official Music Video (June 2022).