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London’s Best Doughnut Shops

London’s Best Doughnut Shops


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In honor of the 21st annual National Doughnut Week (May 12 to 19), a fundraiser for The Children’s Trust in the U.K., The Daily Meal has found London’s best doughnut shops.

Camden Cakes: With an almost cult-like following, Camden Cakes doesn’t have a web site or advertise its weekend presence at Camden Lock Market in Camden Town. Its popularity has come by word-of-mouth among doughnut aficionados. The jovial vendor, who performs East End knees up dances on request, serves 57 varieties. The fanciful flavors include sugar rings, Black Forest, vanilla custard, and cherry jam-filled and triple chocolate-filled doughnuts. Camden Cakes are sold Saturdays and Sundays, 10a.m. to 6 p.m.

St. JOHN Bakery: While St. JOHN Bakery has made a name for itself by making its own bread, the doughnuts are what keep many Londoners coming back to the unexpected spot beneath a railway arch between London Bridge and Bermondsey. Justin Piers Gellatly is the self-taught baker behind the St. JOHN Bakery’s most popular doughnut, the custard doughnut. The shop sells 500 of them in four hours each Saturday morning. The bun recipe took months for Gellatly to perfect and the creamy custard is piped into each doughnut just hours before they’re served. The shop also serves a second fruit filled doughnut which changes. Currently it is apple and rhubarb but it may be changed to strawberry or apple soon.

Churros Garcia: Spanish-style churros sprinkled with sugar and optional cinnamon and served with a pot of Valor chocolate are the solitary item on the Churros Garcia menu. Limited-edition flavors like cheese dip, port wine chocolate, chile chocolate, and mocha chocolate have made appearances on the menu from time to time, but the churros con chocolate are what have led the churros revolution in London.

The vegan treats are made with Encarnacion Garcia Fuenteseca’s 40-year-old churros recipe and sold from three stalls at Portobello Road Market (opposite the Electric Cinema) on Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Southbank (behind Royal Festival Hall) on Fridays, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturdays, 11a.m. to 8 p.m., and Sundays 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Broadway Market in Hackney on Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!


How To Make Doughnuts

Doughnuts or donuts, whatever you call them, you don't need super sharp culinary skills to make the perfect ones at home &mdashanyone can do it! What you do need is plenty of time, making them the perfect weekend baking project. If you want them for breakfast, wake up early and take a nap during each rise. 😉

This recipe is for everyone&rsquos fave: classic glazed. The results will have you ruined for all other doughnuts. seriously, they even give Krispy Kreme a run for their money.

Dealing with dough. The very first step in creating doughnuts is blooming your yeast: dissolve sugar into lukewarm water, then stir in the yeast. In about 5 minutes, it&rsquoll have turned into a foamy, bubbling layer on top of the water. This is how you know your yeast is alive and that your dough will rise! Stir in with your other ingredients, mix, and then knead until the dough feels smooth and elastic. To test if your dough is ready, lightly press your thumb into the dough. In about 5 seconds or so, the dough should bounce almost completely back.

Let it rise. Doughnut dough needs to rise twice: first, the dough itself, then the punched out doughnuts. While the second rise is happening, begin heating up your oil and making your glaze!

Do I need a thermometer? Yes. Since doughnuts fry for such a short amount of time, you want to make sure the oil is at the temperature that&rsquoll allow them to cook through without burning and turn a perfect golden colour. We found 180°C to be the sweet spot (no pun intended). Also, keep in mind that the temperature fluctuates after your first batch of doughnuts goes in, so make sure to keep an eye on your thermometer and adjust accordingly.

Help! I don't have a doughnut cutter. Not to worry! Since we work in a well-stocked test kitchen, we happened to have one, but we wouldn't expect you to (unless your name is Ina or Martha). Use a 7.5 cm (3") biscuit or cookie cutter, plus a very small one, about 2.5 cm (1"), or the large end of a piping tip for the holes.

Glazing 101. Make your glaze in a large, wide bowl for easy coating. Next, make sure to glaze your doughnuts while they're still warm! This way, it'll stick much better. plus, then you can eat them while they're warm. Once you dip your doughnuts into the glaze, place them onto a cooling rack set over a baking tray to let the excess drip off. This makes for a much easier cleanup and evenly glazed doughnuts. If you want, you can add sprinkles (or chocolate chips, or toasted coconut flakes, etc.) at this point!