Traditional recipes

Creole Fish Stew

Creole Fish Stew


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Ingredients

  • 1/3 Cup canola oil
  • 1/3 Cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 Cup chopped yellow onion
  • 1/2 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 Cup chopped celery
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 1/2 Teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 Teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Cayenne, to taste
  • One 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • 1 Cup water
  • 2 Cups chicken broth
  • 1/2 Cup long-grain white rice
  • 1 1/2 Pound cod fillet, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1/4 Teaspoon salt
  • Black pepper, to taste
  • 2 green onions, sliced
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Heat oil in a large heavy-bottomed soup pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Slowly stir in flour with a wooden spoon. Cook mixture 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it turns the color of milk chocolate. Add onion, bell peppers, and celery to pot and cook, stirring, for 5 to 7 minutes until vegetables are softened. Add garlic, paprika, thyme, bay leaf, and cayenne and cook for 2 more minutes. Add tomatoes, water, and chicken broth and bring to a boil. Stir in rice, cover pot tightly with a lid or foil, and place in preheated oven. Bake for 25 minutes.

Season fish with salt and pepper to taste. Remove pot from oven and add fish to pot, making sure that the pieces are completely submerged in cooking liquid. Cover and return to oven for 5 to 7 more minutes, just until fish is cooked through. Stir in sliced green onions and chopped parsley just before serving.


Fish Creole

We are very blessed here on the Gulf Coast to have access to a wide variety of fresh fish, that frankly most of us grew up practically weaned on - flounder, speckled trout, grouper, snapper, redfish, mullet, and of course, let's not forget Mississippi farmed catfish. Yep, we're pretty spoiled and fish makes a regular appearance on the menu for us here. I love it pretty much any way that you can fix it really - grilled, smoked, blackened, broiled - it's all good, though fried and baked are the two most common ways that many of us prepare it.

Lightly breaded and shallow pan fried is far less messy than deep frying, which is outstanding, but can leave that fried aroma in the atmosphere for what seems like forever. I tend to pan fry more often because of that, but when I do a fairly big fish fry, it's deep fry all the way. I just take the fryer outside!

A good sauce is another way you can totally transform a nicely seasoned and pan seared piece of fish, and a Creole sauce is a common one for a lot of different proteins here in the Deep South. From good old spaghetti, to meatballs, meatloaf, coubion and basic sauces, I use it a lot, so I tend to put some up in the freezer when summer tomatoes are in. It's perfect for fish.

Any good, firm, mild tasting fish would be great in a Fish Creole, but always use a quality, American wild-caught or responsibly farmed source of fish. Good choices would include halibut, haddock, redfish, snapper, catfish, grouper, trout, cod or tilapia.

Peel and devein shrimp if needed. Heat 1/2 tablespoon of the oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium high. Lightly season shrimp and fish with salt, pepper, Old Bay and Creole or Cajun seasoning set aside. Add shrimp to skillet and stir fry just until lightly pink, slightly undercooked. Remove and set aside. Add another 1/2 tablespoon of the oil to the skillet and add fish, searing on both sides until lightly browned, about 2 minutes per side remove and set aside with the shrimp. Heat remaining oil and add vegetables, cooking until tender, about 4 minutes, stirring constantly.

Sprinkle in flour, cook and stir for 1 minute. Add stock, tomatoes, capers (if using), parsley, herb seasoning and bay leaf. Squeeze in the juice from one lemon wedge, bring to a boil. Add the fish, top with the shrimp, spoon some of the pan sauce over the top of the fish, cover, reduce heat and simmer for about 5 to 7 minutes, or until fish is cooked though and opaque in the center. Taste sauce and adjust seasonings.

Add hot sauce or dried pepper flakes and serve with hot rice with lemon wedges and a side salad or green vegetable.

My plate, served with a side of skillet asparagus and some of the Creole sauce spooned over the rice.
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Recipe: Fish Creole

Yield: About 4 to 6 servings

  • 1-1/2 tablespoons cooking oil , divided
  • 1 cup peeled and deveined (31-35 count) large, raw shrimp
  • 1-1/2 pounds (about 4 fillets) firm, mild tasting thick fish fillets (see Cook's Notes)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon each Old Bay seasoning and Creole or Cajun seasoning (like Slap Ya Mama), or to taste
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped bell pepper
  • 1/8 cup chopped celery
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon chopped jalapeno
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup seafood stock, chicken broth, white wine or water
  • 1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes , undrained
  • 1 tablespoon capers , optional
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley
  • 1 teaspoon Herbes de Provence or Italian seasoning
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Lemon wedges
  • Couple dashes of hot sauce or dried red pepper flakes, optional, to taste
  • Hot, cooked rice

Heat 1/2 tablespoon of the oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium high. Lightly season shrimp and fish with salt, pepper, Old Bay and Creole or Cajun seasoning set aside. Add shrimp to skillet and stir fry just until lightly pink, slightly undercooked. Remove and set aside. Add another 1/2 tablespoon of the oil to the skillet and add fish, searing on both sides until lightly browned, about 2 minutes per side remove and set aside with the shrimp. Heat remaining oil and add vegetables, cooking until tender, about 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Sprinkle in flour, cook and stir for 1 minute.

Add stock, tomatoes, capers (if using), parsley, herb seasoning and bay leaf. Squeeze in the juice from one lemon wedge, bring to a boil. Add the fish, top with the shrimp, spoon some of the pan sauce over the top of the fish, cover, reduce heat and simmer for about 5 to 7 minutes, or until fish is cooked though and opaque in the center. Taste sauce and adjust seasonings add hot sauce or dried pepper flakes and serve with or spooned over hot rice with lemon wedges and a side salad or green vegetable.

Cook's Notes: Use a quality, wild-caught or responsibly farmed source of fish. Good choices would include halibut, haddock, redfish, snapper, catfish, grouper, trout, cod, catfish or tilapia are all good for this recipe. Herbes de Provence contents will vary by brand. I use McCormick brand which is a mixture of rosemary, marjoram, thyme, savory and lavender. Of course, substitute a mixture of fresh herbs, if you have them!

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Cajun Coubion - Courtbouillon

A court bouillon is a French poaching stock made from water and typical stock veggies - onion, carrots, celery - in which generally fish is cooked. But that's the French.

Down here in The Deep South, Courtbouillon is a sort of roux-based, creole tomato sauce, stewed down and reduced, and most commonly used to poach redfish, though red snapper or catfish are fairly traditional also.

If you enjoy fish, this is a great dish for Lent, that is somewhat similar to Bouillabaisse, though I side with Marcelle Bienvenu, Times Picayune contributor, and author of the fantastic Cajun/Creole cookbook and a top favorite in my personal collection, Who's Your Mama,Are You Catholic, and Can You Make a Roux?

She and I both agree that in most Cajun Courtbouillon, the fish is added in the last minutes of cooking, and only right on the top, then covered over and gently poached, where in a Bouillabaisse, the fish is laid between layers of sauce, and slow simmered for a much longer time.

Very often other seasonal seafood, such as oysters, crawfish and shrimp are also added to both Bouillabaisse and Courtbouillon. It's a great recipe to use some of that microwave roux from yesterday's post.

For Courtbouillon, since the fish is poached right on top of the creole sauce, many types will work, so substitute your favorite fairly firm, white fish, such as grouper, trout, cod, or tilapia.

Once the fish is poached through, carefully ladle it into a deep soup bowl, over steaming rice. Add a nice, mixed garden salad, a wedge of lemon, some fresh, hot French bread and always, hot sauce to pass at the table.

Cajun Coubion - Courtbouillon

Ingredients

  • 4 cups homemade seafood stock*
  • 2/3 cup microwave roux
  • 1 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 (1 pound 12 ounce) can whole tomatoes
  • 1 can Rotel tomatoes
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon Creole/Cajun seasoning (like Slap Ya Mama) or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
  • 3 pounds redfish, red snapper or catfish, cleaned
  • Additional salt and pepper, to taste
  • Green onion, to garnish
  • Fresh parsley, to garnish
  • Hot, steamed rice
  • Hot sauce, for the table
  • Lemon wedges

Instructions

  1. Warm the seafood stock and set aside. In a large, heavy, lidded pot, warm up the roux over medium heat, stirring constantly. If you haven't already, add the onion, celery and bell pepper to the roux and cook for about 3-4 minutes or until vegetables have softened. Add the garlic and cook another minute.
  2. Using kitchen shears, chop the tomatoes in the can, and add to the roux and veggies. Add the Rotel tomatoes. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 30 minutes. Stir in the warmed seafood stock and add the salt, pepper, Cajun seasoning, and bring up to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about one hour, or until nicely reduced and thickened. Taste and adjust seasonings.
  3. Add the fish (and other seafood if using) to the top of the sauce, sprinkle it with a bit of additional salt and pepper, cover and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, or until fish is poached and cooked through. Don't stir!
  4. Once the fish is poached through, carefully ladle the courtbouillon into a deep soup bowl, over steaming rice. Add a nice, mixed garden salad, a wedge of lemon, some fresh, hot French bread and always, hot sauce to pass at the table.

Notes:

May substitute 1 (32 ounce) container of commercial seafood stock (like Kitchen Basics), chicken or vegetable broth, or plain water. Substitute your favorite fairly firm, white fish, such as grouper, trout, cod, or tilapia.

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Catfish Head Stew

On a crisp, cool Friday morning on my way to Eunice, Louisiana, to stock up on my favorite garlic smoked sausage at my friend Kermit Lejeune’s smokehouse, I drove past a little market on the highway heading west out of Opelousas. I did not have seafood on my mind, but it was the colorful exterior signage on the building that caught my eye. I made a U-turn to shoot a quick photo.

Located in Opelousas, this little market has it all.

I had taken a few shots when the door burst open, and a most attractive lady in pink rubber boots emerged with a big smile and inquisitive look. I was about to meet Sharon Sebastien, the owner of Sebastien’s West End Seafood (see Faces and Places page for directions).

When I told her who I was, I was invited to come inside and learn more about her world of seafood. As I gazed in awe at the chalkboard menu on the wall, I was in heaven. Gou, garfish, snapping turtle (live and dressed), collar bone, frog legs, alligator, and crawfish were just a few of the marquee items on the product listing. And of course, catfish. Lots of catfish.

Whether it swims or crawls, you can find it at West End.

Big blues, flatheads, and channel cats are fished wild in the Atchafalaya Basin and make their way to Sebastien’s where they are sliced and diced in an array of versatile ways. Home cooks buy these cuts for a variety of favorite recipes: Chunks are fried up for nuggets, fillets are blackened, and whole skinned catfish are a delicacy on every dinner table. But the head of a catfish is reserved only for those in the know. Those who know about this down-home recipe for Catfish Head Stew.

Cleaned catfish on ice essential for my Catfish Head Stew.

Where most discard the head of a large 5-pound catfish, in Creole culture they wind up in a black iron pot of Catfish Head Stew. Once the fish is skinned and gutted, the head is removed and cleaned. Troy Deville, the fishmonger at Sebastien’s, fires up the band saw and removes the front half of the head from the eye sockets to the mouth and whiskers. Remaining on the fleshy skeletal structure are white, flaky morsels of cheek meat clinging to one large head bone–all destined for a seasoned braise in a spicy, red, cayenne-infused tomato gravy. This Catfish Head Stew is good eatin’ at only $1.39 per pound. Served over a mound of white rice along with a loaf of crusty French bread, you’re headed to catfish heaven.

Cleaned and sliced, catfish heads combine with ordinary ingredients in an extraordinary Creole dish called Catfish Head Stew.


Seafood Creole -- Enchilado de Mariscos

The delightfully decadent seafood dish that doesn't include a single tortilla -- because it's Cuban!

4 tablespoons olive oil
4 tablespoons butter
1 medium green pepper, chopped
1 large onion chopped
1 cup chopped celery
5 cloves garlic, minced
6 medium ripe Roma tomatoes, peeled and chopped
2 teaspoons cumin
1/4 cup white wine
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup tomato juice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 links Spanish chorizo, diced
2 tablespoons olive oil for sautéing
1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 pound scallops
4 lobster tails, shell on, chopped in quarters
8 mussels (optional)
1/4 cup fresh cilantro chopped

Add the garlic and fry an additional minute or two. Add the tomatoes, cumin, wine, salt and pepper.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, uncovered for about 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, fry the chorizo in a little olive oil in a frying pan until the oil turns orange. Remove the chorizo, keep the oil and sauté the seafood in small batches (don't crowd the pan!) until the shrimp are bright and lobster tail chunks are bright pink, the scallops firm and white. Keep the seafood warm until you are done sautéing all of it.

If you are using mussels, steam them in a pan of water, stock, or wine (using as little liquid as possible) until they open.

Add the seafood to the pan of vegetables and sauce. Stir gently, adjust seasonings as necessary.

Simmer for two or three minutes only to meld the flavors. (You can add the cooked chorizo chunks to the dish, or just snack on them while you're cooking as we do!)

Remove from the heat, sprinkle with fresh cilantro, and serve over rice.

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Creole Fish Stew - Recipes

Haitian specialty consisting of slow-cooking well marinated red snapper with water, tomato paste and spices on medium-low heat. Creole red snapper must be simmered, not boiled. Beside being stewed, the fish can also be fried, grilled, baked or boiled. Fresh fish must have bright and clear eyes, vibrant skin, rich red gills, stiff and well crimped tail, and firm. Never buy fish that are either soft or have pungent smell. Always buy fish scaled and gutted at purchase to avoid extra work. Creole red-snapper prep is similar to fried fish.

1. In a small container, soak fish with white vinegar (5-10 mins.) and rinse with cold water.

2. Remove extra scales on top of fish, near the fins, scraping around the tail, near the

head, and take out unwanted portions inside at the base of the head.

3. Clean fish with 3 limes inside and out up to the jaw, then rinse again with cold water.

4. Squeeze 1 lime halve over fish and marinate with ground spices mixed with the

other lime halve, salt, thyme, parsley, garlic, bell peppers, onions for at least 1 hour.

5. In large skillet, heat oil and sauté onions, bell peppers, then tomato paste.

6. Add seasoned fish along with thyme, parsley, garlic, 1 cup water, and let simmer for 10

7. Turn fish over carefully, add more onions, salt if necessary, cover and simmer 5 more

8. Serve with boiled plantain, watercress, tomato sliced, or lettuce and sliced beets.


  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, sliced
  • 1 large green bell pepper, coarsely chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons Creole seasoning
  • ½ pound andouille sausage, sliced
  • ½ pound turkey kielbasa, sliced
  • 1 cup uncooked white rice
  • 1 pound uncooked medium shrimp, peeled and deveined

Place chicken broth, tomatoes, onions, celery, bell pepper, garlic, and Creole seasoning in the bottom of a 5- to 6-quart slow cooker. Cover and cook on High for 4 to 5 hours, or Low for 8 to 10 hours.

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat during the last 50 minutes of cooking time. Add andouille sausage and turkey kielbasa to the skillet and cook, turning occasionally, until browned, about 5 minutes. Stir sausage and rice into the slow cooker.

Cover and cook on High for 30 minutes. Stir in shrimp and continue to cook until rice is tender and shrimp are just opaque in the centers, 10 to 15 minutes more.


Creole Potlikker Fish Stew: A Bowl of Something Really Good

It’s that time of year when many of us are feeling under the weather, and we’re looking for that one comfort dish to fortify and pamper ourselves. For some, that means cooking up a batch of Mom’s chicken noodle soup. For me, it means digging into a bowl of our Creole Potlikker Stew.

Get your daily dose of vitamins.

Rich in vitamins A, B, C, and K, as well as potassium and iron, the broth in this stew might be just what you need to feel better. In fact, Ari Weinzweig calls it the Southern equivalent of chicken soup. The broth is left over from cooking collard greens with ham hocks and bacon, and the process draws all the nutrients out of the greens and into the liquid. We call the broth potlikker, aptly named because every last drop is a flavor-savor.

In the potlikker itself, we simmer mussels, scallops, and fresh fish from Foley on the East coast. It all gets ladled over bacon-braised greens and Anson Mills’ grits. The greens and grits soak up all that goodness, so you are scooping up the broth with every bite at the bottom of the bowl. All in all, a simple dish, yet it’s really tasty and filling. I love that you can taste the essence of the bacon in the broth.

History you can eat.

Potlikker is as rich in history as it is in vitamins. It can be traced back to the days of enslavement, when masters would keep the greens and leave the broth for the slaves, not realizing that they were handing out the most nutritious part of the dish. The slaves would then make it stretch by adding bean broth and topping it off with cornmeal or flour biscuits.

John T Edge., director of the Southern Foodways Alliances and author of The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South , claims there to be a “subversive beauty in this dish”. There was creativity behind making something last out of necessity, and it is that creativity that connects us with how and what we eat now.

Please don’t dump the potlikker!

The story behind our stew at the Roadhouse started with Ari Weinzweig rescuing the broth before it was discarded from a batch of of our bacon-braised greens. Knowing its history and how yummy it is, he filled up shot glasses with the broth and handed them out to the guests to sample. Everyone loved it!

Ari says “ I think it’s also worth raising a shot glass of it in a respectful toast to the slave cooks who did the unglamorous work. They developed the roots of African-American eating the rest of us get to enjoy today.”

We will always save the potlikker so you can stop in and treat yourself to a bowl! Soak up every last drop with crusty Bakehouse bread or buttery biscuits, and feel better!


Creole Catfish Stew

Hearty but not too heavy, this vibrant fish stew—inspired by one from Food & Wine magazine—is welcome any time of year, but especially on early-spring evenings when homegrown offerings are limited. It’s quick to assemble, and leftovers freeze well. Any mild-flavored, firm-fleshed fish can be substituted for the catfish, as can shrimp, scallops, or other shellfish.

Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil
1 large onion, chopped
2 large cloves garlic, minced
2 ribs celery, chopped
1 medium green pepper, chopped
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon Creole seasoning
1/2 teaspoon each salt and freshly ground black pepper (plus more to taste)
1/2 cup dry white wine
3 cups homemade chicken stock or low-sodium chicken broth
2 cups canned crushed tomatoes in puree
2 cups frozen baby lima beans
2 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels
2 pounds catfish fillets, cut into bite-size chunks
Tabasco sauce to taste
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

Instructions
1. In a large pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, celery, and green pepper cook and stir until vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in thyme, oregano, mustard, Creole seasoning, and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Add wine and cook until wine has almost evaporated, about 3 minutes.

2. Add tomatoes and broth bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Add lima beans and simmer for 3 minutes. Stir in corn and simmer 4 minutes more. Add catfish, bring back to a simmer, and cook 2-3 minutes more or until fish is opaque.

3. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and Tabasco. Ladle into bowls and garnish with parsley.


Watch the video: 200 Sätze - Haitianisches Kreol - Deutsch (June 2022).