Traditional recipes

The Best Meals to Bring New Parents

The Best Meals to Bring New Parents


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

We know what new babies eat but what about the parents?

iStock/Mark Goddard

Baby

Two of my best friends had a 6.5-pound baby girl last week. Now that I'm tuned into the baby channel, it seems like everyone is having one—the wife of this guy I work with, my dry cleaner's daughter, Tina Fey. Even Mariah Carey is reproducing. This brings up a lot of questions for the rest of us. For instance, Will I ever be ready for parenthood?, Can I pick up your baby?, and, What is the best dish to bring new parents?

The last question is particularly pertinent today because I just received an invitation to MealTrain.com, a website that helps you organize meals for new parents. Now I have access to a shared calendar where I can choose a day and declare what meal I'll bring, so that the new parents won't get seven pasta dishes in a row. This public dish display brought extra pressure to the decision. I had to research.

First, guidelines for bringing food to new parents:

  • Leftovers are a plus
  • Beware of onions, garlic, spiciness, broccoli, beans, and cauliflower, which can create problems for mom and baby.
  • Ditch heavy dishware. Jessica Ashley, Shine's Parenting editor, said that casserole dishes were too heavy to pick up with one hand while she was holding her baby. Instead, aluminum pans are light, recyclable, and don't have to be washed.
  • Make sure food is packed in easy-to-store containers for zero-effort clean-up.
  • Vegetables! Parents say that during those crazy first months they didn't get as many as they needed.
  • Don't forget dessert. New parents need chocolate, too. Wrote one mom on Chowhound, "people tend not to give you sweet stuff, but we craved a decent dessert!"

Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).


Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).


Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).


Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).


Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).


Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).


Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).


Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).


Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).


Recipes to Bring to New Moms

My friends have been procreating at an alarming rate and this means I’ve gotten really good at two things: choosing which books to send to my newly pregnant ladies, and making meals for families with brand new babies. (I’m also a good babysitter, but that usually comes in handy a bit farther down the line.)

A couple years ago when my mother was very sick I developed a list of guidelines for bringing meals to others, and I try to stick to them when I’m bringing food to my freshly parented friends. But I also have a few things that I do just for new moms: first, I always bring beer, because it supposedly helps with lactation, and because mama probably hasn’t had a drink in a long time, and she deserves a cold one. Second, I have a couple of recipes that I always use for new parents. I’m willing to do a little more work in the kitchen when I know I’m cooking for a new family. The extra time and steps in the recipe are my way of showing I really care. And these recipes are easy to make and split into two–one dish for the new family, and one for my family and me.

But the art of bringing food to a new mom (or dad) isn’t just in choosing a recipe and making it. The whole point of bringing a meal is to be helpful and supportive, so you want to bring everything in a way that’s as low maintenance as possible. I bring things in recyclable or disposable containers, and make it clear that I don’t expect them to be returned. Often, I buy a new dish, bake the food in it, and give the meal and the dish to the family as a gift. When I bring the food I try to include a note about what’s in everything, and I make an effort not to stay too long when I’m dropping off the food (unless I’m invited to stick around).